The hope of a local title lay with 6 dutch men and women going into the weekend, come finals day it was down to just the 2nd seeded Yao Jie who delivered on local soil in Almere.

Hsueh Hsuan Yi claimed the men’s singles title in an all-Chinese Taipei final, defeating Chen Chou Tien in a three-game, 66 minute final The all-Thai mixed doubles final went the way of the 2nd seeded Anugritayawon and Voravichitchaikul as they defeated the top seeded Prapakamol and Thoungthongkam in two games. Voravichitchaikul claimed a second title in the women’s doubles, partnering Aroonkesorn as the top seeds defeated the 2nd seeded Yao and Sari of Singapore in two games.

The men’s doubles was won by the 3rd seeded Cwalina and Logosz after they defeated the top seeded German pair of Kindervater and Schoettler in a tight three game match but the story of the day was the victory of Yao Jie in the women’s singles. The 2nd seed defeated the unseeded Sindhu of India in two games, but it was a week that could have been so different after saving a match point in her opening round match against Chiang Pei Hsin of Chinese Taipei.

Finals Results

It was a quick final day for the Czech International Grand Prix tournament. No matches went to three games, and no matches lasted longer than fifty minutes.

The finals kicked off with the mixed doubles finals of Alexandr Nikolaenko and Valeri Sorokina of Russia against Gert Kunka and Amanda Hogstrom of Estonia and Sweden respectively. Both the Russians had another final later in the day in their respective Men’s and Women’s doubles, making a double crown for each possible. The entire match lasted only twenty six minutes with the Russians taking the prize, 21-15 and 21-12.

The first final with a Czech player was the women’s singles final, featuring Czech sensation Kristina Gavnholt, who had not dropped a set in the tournament yet, against India’s Arundhati Pantawane. The Indian player had a much tougher road to the final having a three set semi-final the day before. The match was the second longest of the day coming in at forty minutes. The home crowd had a reason to cheer in the end as Kristina came out the victor, 21-10, and 21-18.

The women’s final was the next one to be played, and it was Valeri Sorokina’s second final of the day. The Russian team of Valeri Sorokina and Nina Vislova faced off against Canada’s Nicole Grether and Charmane Reid. The Canadians only lasted a total of thirty-four minutes, with the Russian duo walking away with the title, 21-10, and 21-16. This was Valeri Sorokina’s second title of the day.

Next up we had the Men’s doubles, with Russians Vitalj Durkin and Alexandr Nikolaenko facing off against Poland’s first seeds Adam Cwalina and Michal Logosz. The Polish pair kept their magnificent form, defeating the Russians 21-13, and 21-16 in only thirty minutes.

The men’s singles was the match most came to watch. It featured Czech super star Petr Koukal who had made a brilliant run to the final, defeating second seed Brice Leverdez and therefore ending the Frenchman’s winning streak. Koukal was slotted against top seeded Polish player Przemyslaw Wacha. The match was the longest of the day, lasting a total of forty-one minutes. Unfortunately for Koukal, he could not take his home title this year, with Wacha taking the match 21-19, and 21-16.

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Tine Leads Danish Women

The Denmark – Germany was a rematch of the 2008 semi final, with the 3-1 scoreline being repeated in the 2010 event. Tine Rasmussen started the match with a win over Juliane Schenk in the opening singles, 21-16, 21-13. The first doubles was expected to be another Danish win, but the pairing of Overzier and Marinello pulled out a 21-17, 24-22. Camila Sorensen put the Danish back in front with a win over Karin Schnaase in two games, meaning a win for the Neilsen and Ropke would win the match for Denmark.

Goleszewki and Schenk took a opening game lead, taking the first 21-18. The Danish responded by winning the second game 21-15 to take it into a final game. The Danes finished the job with a 21-13 final game victory to send them through to tomorrow’s final.

In the final also, are the Russians after a 3-0 win over the Netherlands. The Diehl/Bibik/Vislova/Sorokina coming good for the second day running with three wins in quick succession to clinch their place in the final. Diehl’s impressive 21-17, 21-7 victory started the rout, followed by Bibik’s 21-13, 21-6 win putting them on the brink of the final and then the Sorokina/Vislova partnership ending the match with a 21-12, 21-18 win to book Russia’s place in tomorrow’s final

Men’s Event

As if Denmark couldn’t get any better, they unleashed Peter Gade for the first time in the semi final. His 21-6, 21-13 win over Marc Zweibler was a frightening warning that Denmark weren’t at full strength until now. Mogensen and Boe’s 21-17, 21-18 win had Denmark of the brink of the final having played just over an hour in the last 2 days. Jan O Jorgensen completed their stunning victory gainst Marcel Reuter 24-22, 21-17 to clinch a place in the final.

What the second semi final had was everything the first didn’t, four matches split in a 3 and a half hour clash that came down to a final rubber. Wacha gave Poland an early lead with a 3 game victory, only for the Ukrainians to take the next two singles matches and one step away from the final. Mateusiak and Wacha fought back from a game down in the first doubles to secure Poland’s second win and a final rubber, winner take all match to face Denmark in the final.

Adam Cwalina and Michal Logosz’s 19-minute demolition clinched Poland’s spot in tomorrow’s final, winning 21-6, 21-12.

Semi Final complete results

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